EnglishEspañol

Resources

Disability Rights North Carolina

Disability Rights supports people with disabilities and those whose decisions affect people with disabilities, focusing on practical solutions through systemic change and the protection the legal rights of people with disabilities through individual and systems advocacy.
http://www.disabilityrightsnc.org/

Div. of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services provides counseling, training, education, transportation, job placement, assistive technology and other support services to people with disabilities through a network of statewide offices.
http://www.ncdhhs.gov/divisions/dvrs

The Family Support Network of NC

The Family Support NetworkTM believes families benefit from the help and support that other families can provide about their child’s special needs through information and available resources. With this information, families can make informed decisions about services and support.
http://www.fsnnc.org/

National Down Syndrome Congress

The purpose of the NDSC is to promote the interests of people with Down syndrome and their families through advocacy, public awareness, and information. When we empower individuals and families from all demographic backgrounds, we reshape the way people understand and experience Down syndrome.
http://ndsccenter.org

National Down Syndrome Society

The National Down Syndrome Society is the leading human rights organization for individuals with Down syndrome and envisions a world in which all people with Down syndrome have the opportunity to enhance their quality of life, realize their life aspirations and become valued members of welcoming communities.
http://ndss.org

National Down Syndrome Society Public Policy

The NDSS National Advocacy & Public Policy Center supports the mission of NDSS to be the leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome by advocating for federal, state and local policies that positively impact people with Down syndrome across the country.
http://www.ndss.org/Advocacy/About-the-NDSS-National-Policy-Center/

The NC Council on Developmental Disabilities

The Council oversees both the provisions of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act (DD Act). The NCCDD works on behalf of over 185,000 people with I/DD living in NC to help communities become more inclusive of people with I/DD and their families.
http://www.nccddc.org/

North Carolina General Assembly

Laws of North Carolina are made by the North Carolina General Assembly which is made of two houses; the Senate, which has 50 members; and the House of Representatives, which consists of 120 members. Each legislator represents either a Senatorial District or a House District.
http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/

Sibling Support Project (Adult siblings)

The Sibling Support Project is dedicated to the life-long and ever-changing concerns of millions of brothers and sisters of people with special health, developmental, and mental health concerns.
https://www.siblingsupport.org

The Arc of NC – Public Policy

The Arc promotes and protects the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and actively supports their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes.
http://www.arcnc.org/advocacy

Alliance Behavioral Healthcare

Alliance is the managed care organization for public behavioral healthcare services for the citizens of Durham, Wake, Cumberland and Johnston counties in North Carolina and offer crisis and assessment centers and case management services.
https://www.alliancebhc.org/

Cardinal Innovations Healthcare

Cardinal Innovations Healthcare is a specialty health plan engaged in the unique managed care model in North Carolina, which relies on strong community partnerships with providers and stakeholders to provide person-centered care.
https://www.cardinalinnovations.org/

Center for Volunteer Caregiving (Adults)

The Center for Volunteer Caregiving engages the community in providing volunteer services to improve the lives of seniors, caregivers and adults with disabilities. In everything we do, we will conduct ourselves with integrity, caring, and compassion.
http://www.volunteercaregiving.org

Div. of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services provides counseling, training, education, transportation, job placement, assistive technology and other support services to people with disabilities through a network of statewide offices.
http://www.ncdhhs.gov/divisions/dvrs

The Family Support Network of NC

The Family Support NetworkTM believes families benefit from the help and support that other families can provide about  their child’s special needs through information and available resources. With this information, families can make informed decisions about services and support.
http://www.fsnnc.org/

First in Families NC

First in Families helps people with disabilities and their families believe in their dreams, achieve their goals and give back to others by assisting children and adults to be more involved and contributing members of their communities across the state.
http://www.fifnc.org/

NC DS Support Organizations

Triangle Down Syndrome Network  www.tdsn.org

Down Syndrome Association of Charlotte www.dsacnc.org

Down Syndrome Network of Greater Greensboro www.team-up.org

Down Syndrome Network of Onslow & Carteret Counties www.dsnocc.org

Piedmont Down Syndrome Support Network www.pdssn.com

Western North Carolina Down Syndrome Alliance www.wncdsa.org

NC Independent Living Rehabilitation Program (IL)

For people with significant disabilities, the Independent Living Rehabilitation Program (IL) can help better manage your life and enjoy a more active life with your family, at home and in the community.  Assistance is offered across the state.
https://www2.ncdhhs.gov/dvrs/pwd/ils.htm

North Carolina Assistive Technology Program

North Carolina Assistive Technology Program provides a wide variety of adaptive equipment for people with disabilities to use at home, work or leisure to make everyday living easier, Equipment is on loan for 2 weeks, followed by help in locating funding sources for purchasing equipment.
http://www.ncatp.org/Overview.html

North Carolina General Assembly

Laws of North Carolina are made by the North Carolina General Assembly which is made of two houses; the Senate, which has 50 members; and the House of Representatives, which consists of 120 members. Each legislator represents either a Senatorial District or a House District.
http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/

North Carolina Special Olympics (2-7 yrs old, Special Olympians 8 yrs. old to adulthood)

Special Olympics provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience the joy of participation across the state.
http://sonc.net/

Residential Housing Options Guide https://www.alliancebhc.org/wp-content/uploads/Residential-Options-for-People-with-IDD-1.pdf

The Arc of NC 

The Arc promotes and protects the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and actively supports their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes.
http://www.arcnc.org/

Think College (Adults)

Think College is a national organization dedicated to developing, expanding, and improving inclusive higher education options for people with an intellectual disability. With a commitment to equity and excellence, Think College supports evidence-based and student centered research and practices by generating and sharing knowledge, guiding institutional change, informing public policy, and engaging with students, professionals and families.
http://ThinkCollege.net

Trillium Health Resources

Trillium Health Resources manages mental health, substance use and intellectual/developmental disability services in a 24-county area in eastern North Carolina. We connect individuals and families to the help they need when they need it and are responsible for managing state and federally funded services for people who receive Medicaid, are uninsured or cannot afford services.
http://www.trilliumhealthresources.org

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (School aged children 3-21 yrs. old)

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools ensures all students acquire the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes to achieve their learning potential. The system supports moderate inclusion, so that even students with the most severe disabilities spend time with typically developing peers.
http://www.chccs.k12.nc.us/academics/academic-programs/exceptional-children

DPI Special Education as the Exceptional Children Division (School aged children 3-21 yrs. old)

Exceptional Children Division works to ensure students with disabilities develop intellectually, physically, emotionally, and vocationally through an appropriate individualized education program in the least restrictive environment across the state.
http://ec.ncpublicschools.gov/

Durham County Public School System (School aged children 3-21 yrs. old)

Durham Public School’s Exceptional Children’s program is committed to ensuring that every student has access to the general curriculum and an opportunity to learn that is equal to that of non-disabled students. Specially designed, research-based instruction is provided in the least restrictive environment to promote student development. We are dedicated to building authentic parent and community relationships.
http://www.dpsnc.net/Page/169

North Carolina Special Olympics (2-7 yrs old, Special Olympians 8 yrs. old to adulthood)

Special Olympics provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience the joy of participation across the state.
http://sonc.net/

Orange County Public School System (School aged children 3-21 yrs. old)

Orange County Schools, in partnership with students, families and the community, is committed to providing challenging and engaging educational experiences that will develop responsible, knowledgeable and resourceful citizens prepared to contribute in our global society.
http://www.orangecountyfirst.com

Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC) (School aged children 3-21 years of age)

The SEAC serves as a conduit between the families of students receiving special education services and the school administrators in the Wake County School System.
http://wakeseac.org/

Wake County Public School System (School aged children 3-21 yrs. old)

The Special Education Services Family and Community Connections team answers questions about the special education process for families moving to the area with a child who has special needs. The team offers parent training about IEPs, success strategies, and resources for children with disabilities.
http://www.wcpss.net/Page/4243

Wrights Law (Birth – 26 years of age)

Parents, educators, advocates, and attorneys come to Wrightslaw for accurate, reliable information about special education law, education law, and advocacy for children with disabilities across the United States.
http://www.wrightslaw.com/

Project Enlightenment (Birth – kindergarten age)

Project Enlightenment is an early childhood education and intervention program of the Wake County Public School System located in Raleigh, North Carolina. Services are available to Wake County teachers and parents of young children birth through kindergarten age.
http://www.projectenlightenment.wcpss.net/

Duke Down Syndrome Clinic (Birth – adolescents)

The Duke Comprehensive Down Syndrome Program is a multidisciplinary referral clinic for the management of Down syndrome in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents in Durham/Raleigh and North Carolina.
http://dukechildrens.org/services/medical_genetics/down_syndrome_clinic

ECAC Exceptional Children’s Assistant Center (Birth – 26 years of age)

ECAC is a statewide, private non-profit parent organization committed to improving the lives and education of all children with an emphasis on children with disabilities and special healthcare needs. Services are provided free of charge to North Carolina families.
http://www.ecac-parentcenter.org/

Greystone Church, Raleigh (Children)

Buddy Break is a free kids/respite program where children with special needs (VIP kids) make new friends, play fun games, enjoy crafts, stories, music activities, and more! Siblings have fun too! Meanwhile, their caregivers get a break from their ongoing care-giving responsibilities for three hours. Buddy Break is open to church members and non-church members with VIP kids.
http://greystonechurch.org/?page_id=276

Help Line – Children with Special Health Care Needs (Birth – adolescents)

The Help Line provides information and referral for those living with, caring for and concerned about a child with special health care needs in North Carolina. Callers can learn about health care programs as well as funding resources available in the state.
https://www2.ncdhhs.gov/dph/wch/families/helplines.htm

North Carolina Special Olympics

Special Olympics provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience the joy of participation across the state.
http://sonc.net/

Richland Creek Community Church, Wake Forest (Children)

Revive! is a monthly respite at Richland Creek designed to allow parents who have children with special needs and their siblings to simply take a break. Parents do not need to be members or regular attenders of Richland Creek. This is a FREE event open to the entire community.
http://www.richlandcreek.com/pages/page.asp?page_id=250756

Sibshops (8 yrs. old – middle school)

Sibshops provide siblings with opportunities for peer support and gives brothers and sisters of children with special needs an opportunity to meet other siblings in a relaxed, recreational setting. Siblings can explore their feelings in creative, light and fun ways and talk about what is usually not talked about. This conversation empowers the siblings to help each other, and in doing so, to help themselves.
http://www.gcffamilysupportservices.org/services/sibshops

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Clinic (Birth – adolescents)

UNC Children’s Dept. of Genetic Disorders provides diagnosis, evaluation, and referrals for relevant health care providers in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents in the Triangle and across the state.
http://uncchildrens.org/uncmc/unc-childrens/care-treatment/genetic-disorders

Nationally recognized genetics physicians and counselors diagnose genetic conditions using the latest chromosomal, metabolic and DNA analysis techniques. Offer personalized genetic counseling and provide your family with a complete, individualized plan for treatment.
http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/medical-services/childrens-services/childrens-specialty-care/more-childrens-specialty-care/genetics

Down Syndrome Diagnosis Network (Pre-natal and post-natal diagnosis)

The Down Syndrome Diagnosis Network (DSDN) connects, supports and provides accurate information to families with a Down syndrome diagnosis across the country.
http://diagnosisnetwork.org

North Carolina Infant-Toddler Program (Early Intervention, birth to 3 yrs old)

The N.C. Infant-Toddler Program (ITP) provides critical supports and services for families and their children who have special needs.  Services make a positive difference a child’s development and are available through 16 Children’s Developmental Services Agencies across the state.
http://www.beearly.nc.gov/index.php/

Speech and language

National DS Support Organizations

Recreational Programs

Specialize recreational programs are offered for people with special needs by a broad range of organizations including:

Raleigh Parks & Recreationhttp://raleighnc.gov/parks/content/ParksRec/Articles/Programs/SRIS/SRISProgram.html
Durham-Parks & Recreationhttp://durham.nc.networkofcare.org/mh/services/agency.aspx?pid=DurhamParksandRecreationDepartmentSpecialProgramsInclusionSummerCamps_371_2_0
Chapel Hill-Parks & Recreationhttp://townofchapelhill.org/town-hall/departments-services/parks-recreation/adapted-recreation-inclusion
Helping Horse Therapeutic Riding Programhttp://helpinghorse.org/
Horses for Hopehttp://www.horsesforhope.org/
North Carolina Therapeutic Riding Centerhttp://www.nctrcriders.org/
Marbles Family Fun Nighthttp://www.marbleskidsmuseum.org/familyfunnight
Gigi’s Playhouse Raleighhttp://gigisplayhouse.org/raleigh
Miracle League of the Triangle Abilities Dancehttp://www.abilitiesdance.org
Holly Springs School of Dancehttp://www.hollyspringsdance.com/
Abilities Indoor Soccer Leaguehttp://www.actwc.com/indoor-soccer-league.html
Capital Area Soccer Leaguehttp://www.caslnc.com/TOPSoccer
Hope Project Futbolhttp://hopeprojectfutbol.net
Special Olympics Wake Countyhttp://sonc.net/wake/
Special Olympics Durham Countyhttp://sonc.net/local-programs/durham-county/
Special Olympics Orange Countyhttp://sonc.net/local-programs/orange-county/
Reality Ministrieshttp://www.realityministriesinc.org/

Behavior Overview: 

Managing Behavior – National Down Syndrome Society

Behavior-Guide-for-Down-Syndrome

 

Dual Diagnosis (DS-ASD)  

Parents of children with Down syndrome and autistic spectrum disorder (DS-ASD) are especially in need of tips to manage inappropriate behavior because there is so little information available about this dual diagnosis for parents or professionals. As parents, you become comfortable accommodating your child’s learning style based on information about Down syndrome and your own experiences. Then the latter diagnosis, autistic spectrum disorder, is superimposed on the first. At this point many parents are overwhelmed. They feel as though all hope for modification is lost. However, if you approach your child’s behavioral difficulties that are often associated with autistic spectrum from a systematic, behavioral perspective, you will feel renewed hope for not only behavioral management, but also for skill development. Learn more

 

Potty Training

Potty training can be a challenge with any child.  Every parent hopes for a smooth process. Each child is different, but there are certain signs to look for in your child to determine their readiness to start using the potty!

Toilet Training and Down syndrome

Toilet Training Program for Individuals with Special Needs – Adapted from the Foxx and Azrin Program

Wiping Sequence Visual

 

Running

They ran in the past and continue to run in spite of strategies created to stop the running. Sound familiar? People who run create stress for everyone involved; often their safety is at risk or their running creates further problems. No matter what the cause, you want the running to stop. The focus of most interventions is to stop the “runner,” a poor use of your time and energy. People will run faster, further and harder when you try to stop them without responding to the underlying needs triggering the running in the first place. How to stop Runners

 

Wandering Behavior

Wandering is the tendency for an individual to try to leave the safety of a responsible person’s care or a safe area, which can result in potential harm or injury. This might include running off from adults at school or in the community, leaving the classroom without permission, or leaving the house when the family is not looking. This behavior is considered common and short-lived in toddlers, but it may persist or re-emerge in children and adults with autism.  Learn more